Female Eastern Bluebird Transparent Watercolor & Time-Lapse Video

Female Eastern Bluebird on Hawthorn (7x10 inch transparent watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Female Eastern Bluebird on Hawthorn (7×10-inch transparent watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Female Eastern Bluebird on Hawthorn (4.5x3 inch detail from 7x10 inch transparent watercolor)

Female Eastern Bluebird on Hawthorn (4.5×3-inch detail from 7×10-inch transparent watercolor)

I finished this painting in May but am just now (finally) getting it posted. I’ve not been idle though. I’ve been busy on a complicated painting that I’ll share soon.

Like most people, I love bluebirds. I’ve painted the brilliantly colored males before but never had gotten around to attempting to render the subtle beauty of the female. Many female birds have similarly understated coloration, and it’s a difficult thing to render. Bright backgrounds can make their muted colors seem boring and undersaturated. In this painting I chose to go with a fairly low-key background color that would make the female’s colors seem to have a bit more zip by comparison. I also set out to give the background a blurry depth of field effect. That’s really easy to pull off in airbrush but harder to control with watercolor washes.

When I was a kid growing up in western New York in the 70’s, Eastern Bluebirds weren’t abundant, despite being the State Bird. Truthfully, I don’t remember coming across them at all. The populations had plummeted due to competition for nesting sites from European Starlings, House Sparrows, House Wrens and Tree Swallows.

Ages ago I read a fascinating article about efforts to bring the Eastern Bluebird back to New York. Apparently, switching to fence posts and road signs made of metal rather than wood had caused a big decline. Previously, the bluebirds nested in the decaying wood of the abundant posts as well as natural tree cavities. Researchers in Minnesota found that Eastern Bluebirds took readily to predator-proof nesting boxes in orchards, pastures and backyard habitats. As a result of human efforts to place and monitor nest boxes, Eastern Bluebird populations have rebounded throughout their original range.

Op Art Birds II

American Robin

American Robin

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

It’s time for some more op-art* bird photos. These are Victor Vasarely-inspired designs. Like the previous images, these are straight-on photos of birds on an op-art bird feeder… without any Photoshop trickery. Previous photos can be seen at http://blog.bohanart.com/2017/06/op-art-birds/.

I designed this artwork on the computer using Adobe Illustrator and Lightwave 3D. After printing each piece, I placed it in the backyard on a special feeder that I built. It’s designed to attract birds as well as to support the artwork, which is sliced into two sections and positioned in front of (below) and behind the bird. The images were taken with a 100mm f2.8 macro on a wirelessly triggered, tripod-mounted camera. Except for small adjustments like cropping and straightening, no Photoshop techniques were used to manipulate these photos!

* Op art, or optical art, is a form of abstract art that gives the illusion of movement by the precise use of pattern and color OR in which conflicting patterns emerge and overlap.

Op Art Birds

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole on a Gray Catbird background, collecting food (assassin bugs) for nestlings 

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole on a Gray Catbird background

Baltimore Oriole

Female Baltimore Oriole on a Gray Catbird background

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole on a Gray Catbird background

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird on one of my Baltimore Oriole backgrounds

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Juvenile Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole

Male Baltimore Oriole collecting food (assassin bugs) for nestlings

I’ve hit a slow patch with freelance work, so I’ve had some extra time to put into several projects that have been on the back burner for a while. These photos are the result of one of those projects.

When I was in art school, I did a variety of paintings that were op art-ish.* I suppose that style of art appeals to me because it is precise. I was a big fan of Victor Vasarely, Julian Stanczak, Carlos Cruz-Diez and others. Back in 1990 I was doing stripy, taped-line paintings on two-sided, 3D, curved canvases. I thought it would be interesting to investigate those again, this time using the colors from different birds. That sounds simple enough, but here is the tricky part: I wanted to get photos of the actual birds on the art… without any Photoshop trickery.

I designed the artwork on the computer using Adobe Illustrator and Lightwave 3D. After printing each piece, I placed it in the backyard on a special feeder that I built. It’s designed to attract birds as well as to support the artwork, which is sliced into two sections and positioned in front of (below) and behind the bird. The images were taken with a 100mm f2.8 macro on a wirelessly triggered, tripod-mounted camera. Except for small adjustments like cropping and straightening, no Photoshop techniques were used to manipulate these photos!

The Baltimore Orioles were much less skittish than the Gray Catbirds. I had several background designs for each and found that although the backgrounds weren’t specifically intended to work with every bird, they all made for interesting images. The American Robin designs are coming up next.

* Op art, or optical art, is a form of abstract art that gives the illusion of movement by the precise use of pattern and color OR in which conflicting patterns emerge and overlap. 

Red, White and Blue (Immature Ring-billed Gull)

Ring-billed Gull (18 x 24-inch transparent watercolor on arches 140lb HP paper)

Ring-billed Gull (18 x 24-inch transparent watercolor on arches 140lb HP paper)

Ring-billed Gull (detail)

Ring-billed Gull (detail)

Ring-billed Gull (2.5 x 3.5-inch detail from 18 x 24-inch watercolor)

Ring-billed Gull (2.5 x 3.5-inch detail from 18 x 24-inch watercolor)


I used to do a lot of larger watercolors, usually in the 18 x 24-inch format but once working 18 x 72 inches! Later I switched to smaller pieces, when we had kids. My theory was that it would allow me to finish more paintings. At first I settled on 10 x 14 as a typical format. Later I went down to 7 x 10 so i could easily fit things on my flatbed scanner. For insects, frogs, toads and salamanders, I’d bring it down further to 5 x 7 inches. Counterintuitively, I noticed that I ended up packing more detail into the smaller paintings, and I spent almost as much time on them as some of the larger ones. At least they were easier to store!

It took me a while to figure out how to pull off this painting. I had sat on the idea since last October. As a family we drove over to Lake Michigan for my wife’s birthday on a birding and lighthouse trip. While at Holland’s Big Red lighthouse, I got photos of an immature Ring-billed Gull on a blue fence with the blurred-out image of the lighthouse behind it. It was a compelling shot, but the bird flew off before I had a chance to really work the shot and make something interesting out of it.

After it bubbled on the back burner of my mind for half a year, I decided to paint it large and push the whole thing in a graphic design direction, making the fence and riveted wall important parts of the composition. I ended up modeling the walls, bird and fencing in 3D so I could play with the design. After two days of monkeying around with a myriad of different compositions, I came up with one that I felt was interesting, and then I took out the paints. When you strip a painting down to so few elements, it makes the placement of every little thing like the rivets more important. Speaking of rivets, there were 65 rivets and bolts to paint on this one. 

Immature Ring-billed Gull, Holland Lighthouse. You can see the blurred out fence and porthole in the red background.

Immature Ring-billed Gull reference photo from Holland Lighthouse. You can see the blurred-out fence and porthole in the red background.

Painting Drafts, Lightwave 3D

Painting Drafts, Lightwave 3D

Painting Draft (Lightwave 3D)

Painting Draft (Lightwave 3D)

"Winning" Draft (Lightwave 3D)

“Winning” Draft (Lightwave 3D)

Painting a bird in a setting devoid of a natural landscape and dominated by man-made elements reminded me of a painting I did twenty years ago of a House Finch sitting on an abandoned, rusting tractor.

House Finch on Tractor (18x24 inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

House Finch on Tractor (18 x 24-inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Tree Swallow Transparent Watercolor & Time-Lapse Video

Tree Swallow (10x7 inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Tree Swallow (10×7-inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Tree Swallow (detail from 10x7 inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

Tree Swallow (detail from 10×7-inch Transparent Watercolor on Arches 140lb HP paper)

This was a quick watercolor-and-ink painting. I had been concentrating on doing highly rendered watercolor paintings for a while and thought it would be fun to whip off a less-detailed, quick, inked piece with bragged-up colors. This Tree Swallow was at the top of the “to be inked” list.

This particular bird was at Ottawa NWR sitting on a teak bench. We were on a family birding trip to Northern Ohio for spring migration in 2016. Since all four of us love wildlife, especially birds, we take day trips and occasional overnight trips to go birding during migration, seeking out birding areas wherever we travel.

When I was a kid our family vacations were fairly predictable. Aside from a few exceptions, we went to a beach for a week. My dad loved the coast, swimming in the ocean and sitting around reading books. My mom welcomed a week with a change of routine, but I think she still had more than enough on her plate, not the least of which included wrangling three boys. Since my grandparents and cousins lived in NYC and the surrounding  area, that often meant that we’d vacation on Long Island and visit with relatives as well.

I tended to get bored pretty easily at the beach. My brothers would read, but as a kid I wasn’t into books, unless you count B.C. and the Wizard of ID. At the end of the day I often had a lobster-deep sunburn and, after being tossed around in the surf for hours, a diamond-abrasive clump of 60-grit sand in my swimsuit. On the plus side, those beach trips let me enjoy seeing all sorts of shells, sandpipers, sanderlings. I also loved climbing in the dunes and looking at the storm debris that got washed up high on the beach, finding feathers, crab exoskeletons, fish and bird bones among the detritus. 

Seeing washed-up jellyfish was always cool, although when I was really young I’d give the dead cnidarians about four feet of cautious space. I was fairly certain they might spontaneously explode or perhaps come back to life, jumping on to me, ferociously attacking with deadly, fiery tentacles. Surprisingly, that never seemed to happen! My dad loved telling a story of going to the beach with his cousins while on family vacation. As young boys tend to do, he and his younger brother Joe discovered a “fun” game. They’d find a wooden slat from a sand-break fence, then use it to flick a small, dead jellyfish at their victim. Better yet, if needed, they would use their fence stick to section a bigger, putrefying jellyfish into an appropriate size, thus honing their future skills in the surgical field. Once on the end of the stick, they would flick the gelatinous corpse at the nearest unsuspecting youth. Supposedly a relative took a hit to the mouth once. The tale might be more legend than fact, but that never stopped me from asking him to tell it again and again.

We never did any wildlife-specific trips when I was a kid, but we would often have them tangentially. One of the more memorable was seeing sharks on the beach of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. If you see me in person, feel free to ask the long, convoluted story, which is way too long to share here. During that same vacation we went on a ranger-led hike that was fantastic. The Park Ranger explained the dune system and pointed out tons of interesting plants and animals. That was one of my favorite parts of that trip. We’d always go to zoos and aquariums wherever we went. I loved those day trips. No matter where we went, we always managed to have a lot of fun. 

The one bird-related event that was predictable and always greatly enjoyed when we were really young kids happened when we visited my grandparents in the Bronx. My grandmother would grab a loaf of old bread and ask in her thick Irish brogue, “All right boys, who wants to go to the cemetery?” Now a trip to see gravestones with a stale roll of pumpernickel might not sound like a great way to spend your day, but we knew better. This meant we would be going to feed the ducks that hung out there. Honestly, she seemed to enjoy it just as much as we did. It was definitely a different sort of “birding vacation,” but you have to start somewhere. Little things like that surely got me hooked.